Tee / Plant Dyed Slate

$58.00

Limited edition

Slate Grey
Natural Plant Dye - Oak Bark
100% Organic Cotton

100% Made & Dyed in Los Angeles

Size Chart


DYE & DETAILS

100% Organic cotton x 100% Natural Plant dye x 100% Made in USA (LA). It doesn't get more natural than this. The process of dyeing using natural plant dyes is a lot more labor intensive but the results speak for themselves.

This grey color is achieved by mixing Oak Bark and Iron Oxide to create a rich slate grey, that fades beautifully as you begin to wash and wear it. Expect to see highs and lows in the color, due to the dye process, but this makes each piece truly unique and one of a kind.

Garment Details: Classic crew neck, screen printed logo 1 inch below back neck line, screen printed care label inside.

Conservation: By purchasing this product you are helping to support local manufacturing, reduce toxic chemical dyes from our water streams and reducing the need for more pesticides and insecticides which are used for regular cotton growing. 

PLANT DYES

Natural dyes are colorants derived from plants, invertebrates or minerals. The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources such as roots, berries, bark, leaves and wood. 

Colors in the "ruddy" range of reds, browns, and oranges are the first attested colors in a number of ancient textile sites ranging from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age across the Levant, Egypt, Mesopotamia and Europe, followed by evidence of blues and then yellows, with green appearing somewhat later. Polychrome or multicolored fabrics seem to have been developed in the 3rd or 2nd millennium BCE. Textiles with a "red-brown warp and an ochre-yellow weft" were discovered in Egyptian pyramids of the Sixth Dynasty (2345–2180 BCE).

Natural dyes are far more environmentally friendly than the synthetic dyes, as the synthetic dying procedure can produce pollutants and certain diazo dyes are carcinogenic. Natural dyes are free from carcinogenic components and most are known as antioxidants. The rich history of natural dyes is echoed in the vibrant and varied colors one can produce and the art of dyeing is one we are seeing reemerge as people are becoming more conscious about the impacts of chemicals on their environment.

Double
Eleven
Plant

DYE & DETAILS

100% Organic cotton x 100% Natural Plant dye x 100% Made in USA (LA). It doesn't get more natural than this. The process of dyeing using natural plant dyes is a lot more labor intensive but the results speak for themselves.

This grey color is achieved by mixing Oak Bark and Iron Oxide to create a rich slate grey, that fades beautifully as you begin to wash and wear it. Expect to see highs and lows in the color, due to the dye process, but this makes each piece truly unique and one of a kind.

Garment Details: Classic crew neck, screen printed logo 1 inch below back neck line, screen printed care label inside.

Conservation: By purchasing this product you are helping to support local manufacturing, reduce toxic chemical dyes from our water streams and reducing the need for more pesticides and insecticides which are used for regular cotton growing. 

PLANT DYES

Natural dyes are colorants derived from plants, invertebrates or minerals. The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources such as roots, berries, bark, leaves and wood. 

Colors in the "ruddy" range of reds, browns, and oranges are the first attested colors in a number of ancient textile sites ranging from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age across the Levant, Egypt, Mesopotamia and Europe, followed by evidence of blues and then yellows, with green appearing somewhat later. Polychrome or multicolored fabrics seem to have been developed in the 3rd or 2nd millennium BCE. Textiles with a "red-brown warp and an ochre-yellow weft" were discovered in Egyptian pyramids of the Sixth Dynasty (2345–2180 BCE).

Natural dyes are far more environmentally friendly than the synthetic dyes, as the synthetic dying procedure can produce pollutants and certain diazo dyes are carcinogenic. Natural dyes are free from carcinogenic components and most are known as antioxidants. The rich history of natural dyes is echoed in the vibrant and varied colors one can produce and the art of dyeing is one we are seeing reemerge as people are becoming more conscious about the impacts of chemicals on their environment.